New birth

Messages from Judas

Portraits of the followers of Jesus.

These portraits are the results of the communication between the medium H. and Judas. Judas is able to convey an image of each apostle, which H. is able to reproduce. This section was originally envisaged: “Portraits of the Twelve Apostles” I was gently chided by Judas in this message, that there never were only twelve apostles. I guess I should have sensed this, as I have come to realise that Mary Magdalene was one of Jesus’ close followers.

Modern computer techniques are used to construct these portraits, often starting with a similar portrait, rather like the police identi-kit approach. In doing this, H. has had formal training in art, and in his younger days earned pocket money copying the great masters, so reproducing images etched in the mind is not that difficult.

If you click on the photo, a larger image will be displayed. Those names displayed with a blue background link to some details of that disciple.

A good portrait of Jesus, in our opinion, is located here. A description of Jesus, has been given by Ann Rollins. The picture of James below, is also remarkably similar, and James was apparently so similar to Jesus that he was often mistaken for him. A very similar description was also given by John.

If you are up-to-date with scientific research, you will also know that the Shroud of Turin has finally been exhaustively re-evaluated, and the evidence, scientific evidence, is overwhelmingly in favour of it being genuine. That being the case, we are happy to include a photo derived from the image.

 
Judas Andrew Joseph
Matthew James Luke
John Mark Nathanael Simon
   
John Zebedee    
     
     
     

Other Players

 
Pilate Melchizedek  

The Shroud of Turin image

This image undoubtedly is copyright by the individual that created it. However the web site that I found it on, has now closed, and had few details of who the owner might be. This image is not unlike that of James, his brother shown above, and who looked so like Jesus that he was often mistaken for him.